Ayurveda: Healing Body and Soul

Ayurveda is an ancient study, more than 5000 years old, which describes many natural processes of healing and living a healthy life. Though its origin is in India it has now propagated throughout the world, acknowledged and adopted by many in their search for health and happiness. 

The word Ayurveda mturmeric roots in bageans sacred knowledge of life. In the word Ayurveda, “Ayu” means Life comprising the Body, Mind, Senses and Soul. In ancient India, knowledge was sourced from the 4 “Vedas”, scriptures written as guides for the path of life – namely the RIGVEDA, SAMAVEDA, YAJURVEDA and ATHARVAVEDA.

Ayurveda says that our Universe is made up of five elements - Air, Water, Fire, Earth & Ether. The Human Body represents these elements in three forms of energy or doshas namely Vata, Pitta, & Kapha. Every human body has it’s own unique composition of these three doshas. The composition defines not only the health of the human being but also the characteristics and temperament. Any imbalance in thesethree doshas generally lead to a lot of health issues - physical as well as mental.

Vata relates to air, and this energy mainly directs functions like Respiration, Circulation and Nerve Impulse. People who have Vata imbalance often suffer from dryness of skin and hair, mood swings, headaches, joint pain, bloating, constipation. 

Pitta relates to fire and water in Human body. “Fire” takes the form of Enzymes which are secreted in the stomach and liver which digest food, which is transformed in to Energy. The common symptoms of Pitta imbalance are aggression, loss of temper, acid reflux and ulcers.

Kapha is derived from the elements Earth and Water. When it is present in the right proportion it provides strength, stamina, immunity, and mental peace. Otherwise a person can experience lack of motivation, feel depressed, tired and lethargic and have abnormal food cravings.

Ayurveda says that every person should try to find their natural balanced state by modulating their behavior and environment. A person who has learned to balance all the three doshas is described as “Sushrut Samhita” in Ayurveda – which means he or she has a sound mind, healthy body and a content soul.

4th of July Ayurveda Deals 2014

July 4th Ayurveda DealsGet ready for 4th of July sale with this amazing discount on all your Ayurvedic Herbs! We will be offering offering FREE SHIPPING on all orders in the U.S. over $75 all weekend long! We are also still offering Buy 2, get 3rd free on all of our supplements. Hurry, this deal is one-of-a-kind and won’t last too long! This offer is good through Tuesday, the 8th of July 2014.

Memorial Day Ayurveda Deals 2014

Tattva's Herbs Memorial Day Sale

Get ready for black Memorial Day Weekend with this amazing discount on all your Ayurvedic Herbs! We are going to start a bit early this year! We will be offering offering 35% OFF EVERY ORDER storewide and FREE SHIPPING on orders over $75 all weekend long. Hurry, this deal is one-of-a-kind and won’t last too long! This offer is good through Tuesday, the 27th of May 2014.

Is Ayurveda For You?

Ayurveda – “The Science of Life” or Ayurvedic medicine is one of the world’s oldest holistic (whole-body) healing systems. It began in India many thousands of years ago.

The basis of Ayurveda is the idea that health and wellness is dependent on a delicate balance of the mind, body, and spirit. The primary idea of Ayurvedic medicine is to promote good health preventatively, rather than battle illness after it arrives.

It is a simple concept that includes many intricate beliefs and practices.

balancing-the-doshas

If you are considering making Ayurveda a part of your life, we recommend a few great books:

“Ayurveda For All” by Murli Manohar

“The Healing Power of Herbs” by Michael T. Murray N.D.

“Practical Ayurveda: Secrets for Physical, Sexual & Spiritual Health” By Atreya & David Frawley

“Ayurveda: Science of Self-Healing: A Practical Guide” By Vasant D. Lad & Angela Werneke

“The Yoga of Herbs” by David Frawley and Vasant Lad

Ayurveda offers a body of wisdom designed to help people realize their full human potential using diet, behavior and the proper use of our senses, Ayurveda reminds us that “health is the balanced and dynamic integration between our environment, body, mind, and spirit.”

The real question that lingers is this – Why wouldn’t one practice Ayurveda?

Tattva’s Herbs was founded in 2000 with the desire to deliver the finest quality products that Mother Nature has to offer. We do not cut any corners or spare any expense to bring you the ultimate in quality and signature Ayurvedic oils, supplements, creams, chyawanprash and more. We accept it as our personal responsibility to present the world of Ayurveda to you with great care and respect, and without adulteration. Everyone involved in Tattva’s Herbs is proud of what we do, and we are grateful to be able to share our gifts with you. Ayurveda is one of the world’s richest treasures and should be respected as such.

Five Reasons Why YOU Should take Boswellia Serrata Today!

Boswellia-web

Boswellia serrata (frankincense) is a tree found primarily in India. In order to harvest the Boswellia tree for human consumption, strips of the bark are peeled away leaving

gummy resin.

This resin, is the medicinal part of the boswellia tree.  Extracts of this gummy substance are what is typically used in Ayurveda for a variety of health conditions.

 

Here is our list of the top 5 ways that you can benefit from this magical substance:

1) Provides relief for painful joints – Boswellia has been shown to enhance the blood flow to joints. In turn, this increases joint mobility and eases stiff joints.

2) Supports healthy respiratory function – It is great for your lungs, and has been shown to help suppress coughs and respiratory circulation.

3) Protects the liver & heart - Boswellia has potent anticoagulant properties, which both your heart and liver will thank you for! Preventing your blood from getting too sticky is vital to healthy circulation and stroke prevention.

4) Helps to lower cholesterol - Boswellia has been reported to lower cholesterol and triglyceride levels.

5) Reduces inflammation - This is the most well known benefit of Boswellia. Many schools of thought agree that inflammation is the root cause of nearly all disease. Boswelliia has been shown in countless studies to reduce inflammation and increase blood flow. This alone, is helpful to so many ailments and conditions that people battle everyday.

There are many other benefits of this one-of-a-kind herb, and we encourage you to read more here.

Treating diabetes using Ayurvedic medicine

Guest post written by Mike Gerard 

Diabetes is widely referred to as the “silent killer,” in much the same way that people label high blood pressure. This is due to the fact that many individuals are unaware that they are diabetic. Typically, people treat diabetes with a variety of methods. Insulin, diabetes pills and exercise combined with meal plans, are all ways in which you can treat diabetes. Unfortunately, some of these medications can cause side effects, and the body is capable of rejecting these medications as well. Some people turn to alternative methods to treat diabetes, however. One of these methods is called Ayurvedic treatment.

Ayurvedic treatments focus on a holistic or whole-body approach to treatment. Ayurveda was developed in India many thousands of years ago. It operates off of the principle that the key to treating different ailments is to achieve a balance between the body, spirit and mind. Those who choose Ayurvedic treatments place value on using a natural approach. The goal is to allow the mind, body and spirit to achieve a sense of harmony through a balanced treatment plan of eating correctly, resting, practicing relaxation techniques like yoga, and much more.

It is important to remember that Ayurveda operates off of the fact that the human body is made up of 5 main elements: fire, air, water, earth and space. Additionally, these elements serve to form three energies which are called the vata dosha, pitta dosha and kapha dosha. When you consider that these 3 energies are responsible for body circulation, digestion and the foods that you eat, then you can begin to understand why more people are taking an Ayurvedic approach to the treatment of diabetes. While many traditional methods and medications appear to be the best treatments, there are people who still swear by the benefits that Ayurveda produces.

Natural remedies associated with Ayurveda include limiting foods which are high in sugar, and eating whole-grain food as well. In addition to these, limiting the consumption of alcohol and foods which are high in fat content are cornerstones to this approach. It is also important to spread out your meals throughout the day. Breaking up larger meals into smaller ones allows your body to increase its metabolic rate as well. Another remedy for diabetes includes the mixture of 1/2 teaspoon of Turmeric Powder, 1 teaspoon of Amla Powder and 1/2 tablespoon of Methi Seeds Powder in water. This is supposed to be taken once daily, and on an empty stomach.

The Ayurvedic approach to the treatment of diabetes should not begin without careful consideration of your individual condition. All diabetics exhibit different symptoms at different times, so it is very important to consult your doctor before you begin a new treatment. Many people find that using Ayurveda gives them a healthy alternative to synthetic drugs. Take the time to review the results of others, and then you can determine if the Ayurvedic approach to diabetes treatment is right for you.

Gymnema-Sylvestre-webSome studies revealed that Gymnema Sylvestre (also called gumar) lower serum glucose levels, being effective in the management of blood sugar levels in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This herb decrease the amounts of sugar that is absorbed from various foods. Also, it works positively on pancreas, prompting it to develop more beta cells, the natural source of insulin. Gymnema Sylvestre should be used as a support to standard diabetes treatment. The dosage of  Gymnema ususally consist of 400 to 600 mg daily of an extract standardized.

Triphala powder, an Ayurvedic herb that consist in Amalaki, Haritaki and Bibhitaki may be an useful solution to diabetes. It is recommended to read all about these herbs before taking it.

Timing of Administration of Herbs

From: Ayurvedic Herbology East and West, A Practical Guide to Ayurvedic Herbal Medicine, written by: Vishnu Dass

In Ayurvedic herbology, the timing of administration of a medicine is another important factor to consider, as it may enhance its effects. Herbs that are taken before meals work more on the colon, kidneys, and reproductive organs, and play a key role in supporting the functions of apana vayu, the downward moving aspect of vata that governs elimination of waste products and menstruation. Herbs with mild laxative, diuretic, and emmenagogue properties also act on the lower half of the body, and can be taken before food to strengthen their action.

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Herbs taken along with food act directly upon the stomach, spleen, liver, and small intestine. They support samana vayu, the aspect of vata governing digestive functions, as well as jathara agni and pachaka pitta, the main fires of digestion in the stomach and small intestine. Herbs acting on the middle part of the body are carminatives, stimulants, bitters, and nutritive tonics. Herbs taken after meals work on the upper portion of the body and directly affect prana, udana, and vyana vayus, giving them a stronger action on the lungs, heart, brain, and nervous system. Below is a list of times of administration and therapeutic effect they enhance.

Anannkala: Empty Stomach

Herbs taken first thing in the morning, then allowing as much time as possible (1-3 hours) before taking food, help to increase agni and burn ama and plegm. This is a good time to enhance various properties such as lekaniya (scraping of fat). This is the ideal time to give purgatives, emetics, or rasayanas (rejuvenating substances).

Pragbhukta: Before Meals

Herbs taken at this time are carried quickly to the pelvic region and have the greatest effect on the folon and apana vayu. This is one of the best times for treating chronic indigestion, gas, bloating, abdominal discomfort, and constipation, as well as disorders of the reproductive organs and urinary tract.

Madhyabhukta: During Meals

Herbs taken along with food act on samana vayu, the aspects of vata governing digestive functions in the area of the duodenum and small intestine. This is helpful for kindling the agni, improving peristalisis, absorption, and assimilation. It is also an easier way of taking herbs for those who have difficulty swallowing them or tolerating their taste.

Abhobhukta: Right After Meals

Herbs taken just after food work on the upper portion of the body and directly affect prana vayu, the aspect of vata governing respiration and the nervous system. They also help to restore the function of udana, the vayu responsible for speech, effort, energy, willpower, and memory, as well as that of vyana vayu, which is centered in the heart, moves throughout the body, and governs circulation. Digestive herbs can also be take at this time to treat slow sluggish digestion and help to strengthen and regulate the thyroid gland. People that are sensitive to herbs sometimes prefer to take herbs after meals. This seems to be a convenient time for people to remember to take their herbs, but proper timing should be encouraged whenever possible.

Antarabhukta: Between Meals

The seven bodily tissues receive their nourishment during this time (3 to 4 hours after a meal). Herbs taken at this time travel along with ahara rasa (nutrient precursors) to each of the dhatus, increasing metabolic activity.

Muhur Muhur: Frequent Administration

This can be as frequent as moment to moment or every few minutes. This method helps to send a constant reminder to the body. It is used for acute disorders of prana vayu like hiccup, burping, asthma, cough, and other respiratory disorders. Good examples of this are sipping on teas every 5-10 minutes, or licking certain pastes made from herbs and substances like honey to relieve acute symptoms. Another example is the use of spice blends for digestion (digestive churnas), which can be sprinkled on food and ingested every few minutes with each bite.

Swapnakala: Before Bedtime

Herbs given at bedtime or one hour before sleep help to redirect the movement of vata (vata anuloman). This is a good time to give laxatives or purgatives, and is also an ideal time for treating insomnia and other sleep disorders. Herbs taken at midnight can help with nightmares and disorders of maija dhatu (nerve tissues and marrow).

Sandhyakale: At Sunrise and Sunset

Herbs taken during this time act directly on the joints. Mild laxatives can also be taken at sunrise. Herbs that raise the consciousness, such as brahmi and vacha, can be taken in the early morning to promote good meditation.

For more tips and info visit our website at www.tattvasherbs.com

The Manifestation of Consciousness into Plants

An excerpt from “The Yoga of Herbs” An Ayurvedic Guide to Herbal Medicine written by Dr. David Frawley and Dr. Vasant Lad

Evolution is a manifestation of latent potentials. Within each thing is contained all things. In the seed is the tree; in the tree is the forest. Therefore, intelligence is contained implicitly in the many worlds of nature, not only in our human-centered world. Another way of saying this is that consciousness exists in all forms of life. It is the very basis of creation, the power of evolution. Life, creation, and evolution are the stages in the unfoldment of consciousness. There is nothing in existence that is unfeeling, nothing that is profane or unspiritual, nothing without a unique value in the cosmos. Life is relational, interdependent, interconnective, a system of mutual nourishment and care, not only physically, but also psychologically and spiritually.

circle-of-lifeConsciousness, therefore, is not merely a though, much less intellect or reason. It is the feeling of being alive and being related to all life. Consciousness as pure feeling exists already in the plant and is hidden in rock, even within atom itself. Elemental attraction and repulsion are similar to love and hate, like and dislike. For this reason, the ancient seers of India held that the Self alone exists, that unity is the basis of all existence – that the unity of life is the unity of consciousness.

By this they meant that every living thing was sentient, that everthing was, in the sense of consciousness, human. True humanity, which is humane feeling for all life, is at the heart of all life. Plants and animals sometimes show this sense of caring more than certain humans, who have hardened in their isolated sense of humanity. It is only when we come to look upon all things as human that we are capable of a truly human existence. Such a lesson is taught to us by plants and herbs whose existence is still grounded in the unity of nature, through which we may return to understand ourselves better.

Man as microcosm contains within himself all the elemental, mineral, vegetable and animal kingdoms. Within the plant is the potential of the human being. Conversely, within the human being is the underlying energy structure of the plant. Our nervouse system, it could be said, is a tree whose plant-essence is human. Therefore, plants may communicate directly to that essense of feeling which makes a true human being.

The Plant Kingdom existsto bring feeling into manifestation. On the plant level, feeling exists in a pure and passive form. The animal and human kingdoms manifest this more actively, more separately, but often with less beauty. Consciousness in plants is on a primal level of unity, therefore it is more psychic, telepathic.

Life forms are stations for the reception and transmission of foreces, through which all are nourished. Each thing exists to nourish all others, and, in return, to be nourished itself. In this manner each kingdom of nature serves to receive and transmit life. This life is implicit in light and in the transmission of stellar or astral forces.

The earth, like a gigantic receptor or radio-station, inhales and exhales stellar and cosmic forces, the absorbed essence of which grows and unfolds as life. These forces are not all material, but include subtle energies of an occult or spriritual nature. Plants transmit the vital-emotional impulses, the life-force that is hidden in light. That is the gift, the grace, the power of plants.

Plants bring us the love, the nourishing power of the sun, which is the same energy of all the stars, of all light. These cosmic energies emanated by plants thus nourish, sustain and make grow our own astral body. In this way the existence of plants is a great offering, a sacrifice. They offer us not only their own nutritive value but the very light and love from the stars, from the cosmos whose messengers they are. They bring to us the universal light so that we can enter the universal life. They exist for psychological, as well as physical nourishment. Our feelings, then, are our own inner plants, our own inner flowers. They grow in accordance with our perception of athe nature of all life.

Creation is light. In the Vedas, the ancient scriptures of India, the great god Agni, the principle of Fire, the Divine Seer- Will, builds up the worlds, and makes  of all creation a series of self – transformations.

Plants exist to transmute light into life. Human beings exist to transmute life into consciousnesness, love. Thes three – light, life and love – are one, each an expression of the other, three dimensions of the same existence. Plants transmute light into life through photosynthesis. The human being tansmutes life into consciousness through perception. Through direct perception, the seer is the seen, the observer the observed.

To read more click here to purchase The Yoga of Herbs from Amazon.

 

 

Joint Pain? Inflammation? Four Incredible Ayurvedic Remedies

As you may or may not now, the traditional Ayurvedic school of thought is that all disease and health ailments are rooted in some sort of inflammation. Luckily, there are many great Ayurvedic products that help our bodies deal with these issues.

Out of all the herbs, oils, products, etc. that make up this list, we have chosen what we believe to be the four most important/helpful.

Without further ado -

turmeric-curcumin-with-shadow-sized

 

1) Turmeric – Turmeric (Curcumin) is quite possible the most important herb in all of Ayurveda, and it’s ability to combat inflammation is second to none. You can read all about it here.

 

 

Boswellia-web

 

2) Boswellia - Boswellia is a very poswerful anti inflammatory and also a great pain reliever. Many people use Boswellia in place of Tylenol for pain. You can read more here. 

 

maha-vishgarbha-oil-web

 

 

3) Maha Vishgarbha Oil – Maha Vishgarbha is a very powerful traditional blend of 72 different herbs. This oil has the ability to penetrate deep and have amazing affects! Read all about it here. 

 

 

maha-narayana-oil-web

4) Maha Narayana Oil - Another great traditional Ayurvedic oil blend, this combination of 52 herbs is extremely powerful. Read more here.

 

Why Digestion Is Like a Campfire

By Sara Bowes, L.Ac, MSOM
Portland, OR

campfireDigestion should not be taken for granted — really, it is the central pivot for all functioning in our body. Occupying the actual physical center of the organism, and being the interface between our own inner world and the external environment, as we bring the outside world into us in the form of food, the digestive system ought to be paid utmost attention and care. Nevertheless, modern Western culture has for the most part abandoned any traditions that promote optimally-functioning digestion. The repercussions are multifold. It is no shock that our culture is plagued by fatigue—why should we feel energized if the fire we use to burn our fuel has been essentially extinguished? Not to mention the fact that the fuel we now choose to burn is generally imitation and low-quality. When digestion is compromised, an endless array of disease can manifest—from chronic inflammation and associated presentations like arthritis, heart disease, and diabetes, to mental and emotional afflictions like depression, ADHD, and mental fogginess. Traditional cultures and healing systems, like Ayurveda, for instance, have long recognized the centrality of digestion in terms of overall health, and only recently is modern research beginning to catching up.

The simplest and most profound things we can do to help our digestive center generally involve gently stoking its inherent fire. In Ayurveda, this fire is called agni. So long as agni is strong and functioning well, both food, and also experiences, emotions, and sensory impressions will be processed and assimilated in a healthful fashion. If agni is weak, an excess of poorly processed substance and experience accumulates, resulting in a range of problems on the physical and also emotional and psychological levels. As much as we can contribute to the building of this fire, and at the same time, avoid practices that put it out, digestion will thrive. Just like a campfire, digestion generally likes to be warm and dry. Of course the warmth and dryness must be moderated to a degree so that the fire doesn’t turn rampant.  A variety of factors, including constitution, dietary choices, and climate all will contribute to the terrain of the digestive tract. Depending on these factors, your own unique digestion will require more or less assistance in achieving optimal balance.

Simple practices to encourage our own internal fire should be emphasized by every person whose aim is to enhance the absorption of the food he puts into his body. First, ice water should be avoided at all times—most crucially at mealtimes. Cold does to our bodies what it does in nature, which is to freeze and slow. Pouring ice water into the stomach literally puts a halt to digestion, and is especially detrimental to a system whose preference already is to be comfortably warm. A small quantity of warm water or tea around mealtimes is preferable to cold beverages. Abstaining from drinking large amounts of liquid altogether, however, for 30-60 minutes prior to and after a meal will best benefit digestive function since the acids and enzymes excreted in the digestive process are simply diluted by the addition of liquid. Traditionally, in Indian and Chinese cultures, for instance, small servings of hot tea and/or soup with warming and aromatic spices like ginger and cardamom are eaten at the start of a meal to warm up the digestive tract and prime it for the rest of the meal.

The sun’s presence in our eating ritual is a simple practice to assure that the food we put into our bodies is given the best chance to digest. The biggest meal of the day should really be eaten at midday when the sun is highest in the sky—our bodies absorb and respond to the sun’s power and energy, and so will our digestive center, which particularly thrives in its glow.

Similarly, putting fire into our food, quite literally—through the process of cooking—further takes a load off of the body’s own internal reserves. Cooking food benefits digestion. The process itself can be thought of as a pre-digestive process. Raw food, though full of heat-sensitive enzymes, are for the most part, rough on digestion. It is difficult to assimilate foods in their raw state, and this is often reflected by the tendency to suffer from gas, bloating, loose stools with undigested food, and diarrhea on a raw food diet. Furthermore is the tendency to lose weight and strength (and vitality) when eating strictly this way. Clearly, raw foods can be helpful in particular situations with particular constitutional types, especially in for limited periods of time, for detoxification purposes, for instance. If such a diet is adopted, then it is all the more important to “supplement with fire” from other sources rather than cooking, such as hotter seasons and climates, midday eating focus, and warming herbs and spices.

Quite obvious but nonetheless overlooked is the mouth’s participation in the digestive process. Chewing thoroughly and mixing food with saliva is a necessary first step in breaking down food. Chewing clearly initiates the breakdown of food mechanically, and also introduces energetic warmth to the process by the nature of movement and friction, in the same way that rubbing two sticks together can start a fire. Just as important in this act is the thorough mixing of food with salivary enzymes, which are important for breaking down carbohydrates and fats especially, and for the rest of the digestive process to go according to plan, the optimization of the functioning of these enzymes is necessary. The stomach itself does not release these particular enzymes, nor does it have teeth, so it is crucial that the initial process of digestion in chewing and mixing is done well and thoroughly so that the stomach is not bombarded with a job it is not outfitted to perform. Traditionally, it is recommended that each bite is chewed thoroughly an average of 30 chews, until food is thoroughly liquefied, before swallowed. This will naturally slow down the process of eating, allowing the body’s satiety sensors to register the food being introduced to the system, preventing overeating, which is a natural detriment to digestive functioning as it becomes overwhelmed with the sheer volume of food.

Implementing these simple practices—and learning to recognize habits that are working against your digestion and putting out precious agni (eating in a hurry, chugging ice water before meals, ice cream, living off of raw foods in the winter in a cool climate) will surely over time become preferences as you begin to notice the correlations in digestive comfort and energy levels with the adoption of simple eating habits.